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Kathleen Granados

Kathleen Granados (b. 1986, Long Island, NY) uses materials derived from the domestic sphere to create works that span installation, sculpture, and sound. In utilizing her personal history, Granados investigates memory, generational inheritances, and identity. Her work also considers the tension between personal, public, and political experiences of home.

Between Quiet

2019
Family dishtowels, thread, modeling paste, embroidery scissors, sewing scissors, grooming scissors
91.44 x 76.2 x 1.27 cm / 36 x 30 x 0.5 in (approximately)

‘I come from a multicultural family, and a lot of what I do is informed by traditions of craft and also ritual in the home growing up.’—Kathleen Granados

Cloaked

2020
Wallet-sized photographs
121.92 x 91.44 cm / 48 x 36 in (approximately)

Leftovers

2020
Found eating spoons, modeling paste, family dishtowels, personal dishtowels
Dimensions variable

Kathleen Granados on her practice

I’ve been using personal domestic objects, as well as items from my family members. For example, the piece ‘Between Quiet’ is cut up and recombined family dish towels. I had already been working with sewing and crocheting in the past, and it seemed like a natural progression to use these materials in thinking about meanings and experiences of home. I’m also working with a lot of family photographs as well.

I love using everyday materials, because what haunts is sometimes contained in the everyday. I come from a multicultural family, and a lot of what I do is informed by traditions of craft and also ritual in the home growing up. With an aesthetic and pattern like calico prints, for example, I have positive connotations with quilting in the home, but it is also connotative of pioneer mythos. So it becomes a question of how I navigate this material that has these personal significances, but also contains these ominous associations.

Hunter MFA

The annual Spring 2020 Thesis Exhibition for graduates of the Hunter College MFA Studio Art program represents works by 19 artist graduates of this nationally noted program. Originally planned as a series of physical presentations at Hunter’s 205 Hudson Street campus in Tribeca, but canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the MFA Thesis Exhibition’s digital iteration aims to provide a new, expanded platform for young artists entering the field.

Discover more at huntermfastudio.org